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7-Night Northumberland Guided Walking Holiday

Beautiful landscape image of Bamburgh Castle on Northumberland coast at sunrise with vibrant colors
Duration: 7 nights
Type: Guided Walking
Walking Grade: 1, 2 & 3
from £775pp £675pp

Discover England’s last frontier, home to castles, never-ending seascapes and tales of border battles. Our guided walking holidays in Northumberland will introduce you to the hidden gems of this unspoilt county, including sweeping sandy beaches and the remote wild beauty of the Cheviot and Simonside Hills.

Holiday Highlights

  • Head out on guided walks to discover the varied beauty of Northumberland on foot
  • Admire sweeping seascapes from the coast of this stunning area of outstanding natural beauty
  • Head into the Cheviots to discover what makes this area so special, from the solitude of the hills to the clarity of the night sky
  • Let an experienced leader bring classic routes and offbeat areas to life
  • Look out for wildlife, find secret corners and learn about this stretch of the North East coast's rich history
  • Evenings in our country house where you share a drink and re-live the day’s adventures

What’s included

  • High quality en-suite accommodation in our country house
  • Full board from dinner upon arrival to breakfast on departure day
  • 5 days guided walking; 1 free day
  • Use of our comprehensive Discovery Point
  • Choice of up to three guided walks each walking day
  • The services of HF Holidays Walking Leaders

Trip Notes

Trip notes are detailed, downloadable PDFs for each holiday.

On our Guided Walking holidays, we believe that choice is key. Our walks descriptions will help you choose according to your interests and fitness. The walks are grouped together with care by local experts to give the best experience. While every effort will be made to adhere to the described itinerary, we may occasionally vary the sequence shown here or substitute an alternative route to suit local conditions or for other operational reasons, potentially at short notice.

You're welcome to check in from 4pm onwards.


Option 1 - Buston Links and St Oswald's Way

Distance: 7 miles (11km)

Ascent: 420 feet (120m)

In summary: We begin following Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth. We walk through Buston Links. This grassland is carefully managed by the National Trust you will see blooming wild flowers. Beyond the dunes, lies the southern section of Alnmouth Bay and the sound of the waves crashing on the shore accompanies you as you walk along this near deserted section of the Northumberland Coast.

Highlight: The estuary is renowned as a nature reserve and particularly for migrating waders and wildfowl that gather as autumn approaches. 

Option 2 - In the Footsteps of St Oswald, a Northumbrian King

Distance: 9 miles (15km)

Ascent: 500 feet (160m)

In summary: We follow Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth village to the estuary and renowned nature reserve. There are some fantastic views from the higher path down across the Aln Estuary and the colourful houses of Alnmouth as we make our way towards Warkworth. Look out for fossilised tree stumps on the beach after we turn for Alnmouth.

Highlight: Buston Links is a haven for birds and wildflowers, the latter more so in spring and summer, the former can turn up surprises any time of the year.

Option 3 - To Warkworth and Harry Hotspur's Castle

Distance: 11 miles (17km)

Ascent: 600 feet (200m)

In summary: Combining the Northumberland Coast Path, St Oswald's Way and the National Cycleway, our walk heads south to Warkworth Castle. As well as the history, you'll be rewarded with attractive coastal scenery, with plenty of wildlife and wild flowers at different times of the year. The ruined buildings alongside the coast path are the old guano sheds, built well away from the village, presumably due to the smell of this imported fertiliser.  

Highlight: Learn the history of Harry Hotspur, a member of the powerful Percy family who built Warkworth Castle.


Option 1 - Spy Law, Riverside and Countryside

Distance: 7 miles (11.5km)

Ascent: 560 feet (180m)

In summary: After leaving Alnmouth, meander alongside the River Aln and gently ascend to Spy Law with views on all sides of the countryside. The walk continues moving seawards displaying the Northumberland coast in front of you before returning through colourful cereal fields overlooking the Aln estuary and the once port of Alnmouth towards to sea.

Highlight: A chance to appreciate the variety of scenery that Northumberland has to offer.

Option 2 - To High Buston Hamlet

Distance: 8.5 miles (13.5km)

Ascent: 600 feet (180m)

In summary: Walk around the historic village of Alnmouth and then visit the picturesque village of Lesbury before meandering alongside the River Aln. The walk gives views of countryside and coast, and passes through the Hamlet of High Buston. Learn of the links of the Buston family to King John in 1209 and the traditional “dunking” of the local freemens’ sons. The route returns through undulating countryside culminating in a sight of Alnmouth with colourful houses overlooking the estuary and the sea.

Highlight: An appreciation of how the land and seascape framed local life through the centuries.

Option 3 - Coast, Railway and River

Distance: 10.5 miles (17km)

Ascent: 750 feet (240m)

In summary: This walk gives the visitor a chance to see traditional villages and hamlets of Northumberland and learn about life in this area at various times in the past. The trail passes through green countryside with river, inland and coastal views. The Shilbottle miners’ route to the sea also forms part of this walk. The Hamlet of High Buston is visited along with the villages of Alnmouth, Lesbury and the route passes by the village of Shilbottle with substantial medieval and industrial records.

Highlight: Countryside walking steeped in history with inland and coastal views.


Discover more about Nether Grange and the local area for ideas on how to fill your free day. 


Option 1 - Going around the Foxton Bends

Distance: 6 miles (10 km)

Ascent: 450 feet (140m)

In summary: The 'Bends' are the meanders in the river Aln to the North of the road bridge into the village. Now managed as a nature reserve, on our walk you can explore the local landscape, discover why the most important harbour north of Newcastle completely vanished, and enjoy a walk along the finest sandy beaches in Northumberland.

Highlight: The nature reserve around the River Aln Estuary is an important place for birds, both resident and migrant throughout the year.

Option 2 - To Boulmer - A Smuggler's Haunt

Distance: 8 miles (13km)

Ascent: 500 feet (140m)

In summary: A great storm in 1806 divided Alnmouth cutting off the church and arguably hastening the decline of the busy port. Our walk goes around the estuary to the pretty village of Lesbury, around Foxton Bends, down to the coast and the north to Boulmer. The return journey follows the Coast Path where amongst the dunes overlooking Alnmouth Bay, a Victorian artillery battery established by Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland, can be seen. 

Highlight: Now a quiet fishing village, Boulmer had the reputation as a smuggler's haven with tea being the mainstay of the illicit trade in contraband.

Option 3 - Four Northumberland Villages

Distance: 10 miles (16km)

Ascent: 550 feet (180m)

In summary: Alnmouth, Hipsburn, Lesbury and Boulmer, four villages with long histories on the Northumberland Coast that we visit on this coastal and countryside walk. There is Alnmouth, once a great port, Hipsburn, inseperable from Alnmouth, Lesbury with its Norman church dating back to 1147CE and the smuggler's haunt of Boulmer. On leaving Boulmer, our route follows the Northumberland Coast Path along Foxton and Alnmouth beaches back to the country house.

Highlight: Open countryside, pretty villages, the Northumberland Coast and the River Aln Nature Reserve. 


Option 1 - The Lesbury Estate

Distance: 8 miles (12.5km)

Ascent: 600 feet (180m)

In summary: The Lesbury Estate, which is part of the Northumberland Estate, stretches from Lesbury to the eastern edge of Alnwick. The route enters the estate at the hamlet of Bilton and we ascend gently to reach the Aln Valley railway route which once connected Alnwick with the London Edinburgh main line railway at Alnmouth. The railway route takes the walkers past the railway depot before returning along River Aln.

Highlight: An appreciation of the Northumberland Estate and the tranquil riverside path.

Option 2 - Exploring the Northumberland Estate

Distance: 10.5 miles (16.5km)

Ascent: 880 feet (280m)

In summary: Hugh Percy the 1st Duke of Northumberland wanted to be able to see all his considerable lands easily so he built two follies to give panoramic views of his estate. This route passes along the north bank of the Aln and then ascends towards the first and less well known of his follies built in the late 17th century. Pastureland walking then leads to the eastern end of the Waterside Estate before returning along the tranquil south bank of the Aln and the hamlet of Bilton.

Highlight: The Ratcheugh Observatory creation of the 1st Duke of Northumberland.

Option 3 - The Waterside Edge

Distance: 11.5 miles (18km)

Ascent: 900 feet (280m)

In summary: Leaving Alnmouth and Lesbury and after walking north of the River Aln the route ascends to Ratcheugh Crag, site of the Ratcheugh Observatory built by the 1st Duke of Northumberland. Walking along a green lane we pass through the hamlet of Denwick and onto Denwick Bridge with views of Alnwick Castle. Entering the Waterside Estate, we walk through pastures before returning along the tranquil south bank of the Aln and the Hamlet of Bilton.

Highlight: An iconic view of Alnwick Castle.


Option 1 - Buston Links and St Oswald's Way

Distance: 7 miles (11km)

Ascent: 420 feet (120m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. We begin following Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth. We walk through Buston Links, this grassland is carefully managed by the National Trust you will see blooming wild flowers. Beyond the dunes, lies the southern section of Alnmouth Bay and the sound of the waves crashing on the shore accompanies you as you walk along this near deserted section of the Northumberland Coast.

Highlight: The estuary is renowned as a nature reserve and particularly for migrating waders and wildfowl that gather as autumn approaches. 

Option 2 - In the Footsteps of St Oswald, a Northumbrian King

Distance: 9 miles (15km)

Ascent: 500 feet (160m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. We follow Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth village to the estuary and renowned nature reserve. There are some fantastic views from the higher path down across the Aln Estuary and the colourful houses of Alnmouth as we make our way towards Warkworth. Look out for fossilised tree stumps on the beach after we turn for Alnmouth.

Highlight: Buston Links is a haven for birds and wildflowers, the latter in Spring and Summer, the former can turn up surprises any time of the year.

Option 3 - To Warkworth and Harry Hotspur's Castle

Distance: 11 miles (17km)

Ascent: 600 feet (200m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. Combining the Northumberland Coast Path, St Oswald's Way and the National Cycleway, our walk heads south to Warkworth Castle. As well as the history, you will be rewarded with attractive coastal scenery, with plenty of wildlife and wild flowers at different times of the year. The ruined buildings alongside the coast path are the old guano sheds, built well away from the village, presumably due to the smell of this imported fertiliser.  

Highlight: Learn the history of Harry Hotspur, a member of the powerful Percy family who built Warkworth Castle.


Enjoy a leisurely breakfast before making your way home. 


You're welcome to check in from 4pm onwards.


Option 1 - Going around the Foxton Bends

Distance: 6 miles (10 km)

Ascent: 450 feet (140m)

In summary: The 'Bends' are the meanders in the river Aln to the North of the road bridge into the village. Now managed as a nature reserve, on our walk you can explore the local landscape, discover why the most important harbour north of Newcastle completely vanished, and enjoy a walk along the finest sandy beaches in Northumberland.

Highlight: The nature reserve around the River Aln Estuary is an important place for birds, both resident and migrant throughout the year.

Option 2 - To Boulmer - A Smuggler's Haunt

Distance: 8 miles (13km)

Ascent: 500 feet (140m)

In summary: A great storm in 1806 divided Alnmouth cutting off the church and arguably hastening the decline of the busy port. Our walk goes around the estuary to the pretty village of Lesbury, around Foxton Bends, down to the coast and the north to Boulmer. The return journey follows the Coast Path where amongst the dunes overlooking Alnmouth Bay, a Victorian artillery battery established by Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland, can be seen. 

Highlight: Now a quiet fishing village, Boulmer had the reputation as a smuggler's haven with tea being the mainstay of the illicit trade in contraband.

Option 3 - Four Northumberland Villages

Distance: 10 miles (16km)

Ascent: 550 feet (180m)

In summary: Alnmouth, Hipsburn, Lesbury and Boulmer, four villages with long histories on the Northumberland Coast that we visit on this coastal and countryside walk. There is Alnmouth, once a great port, Hipsburn, inseperable from Alnmouth, Lesbury with its Norman church dating back to 1147CE and the smuggler's haunt of Boulmer. On leaving Boulmer, our route follows the Northumberland Coast Path along Foxton and Alnmouth beaches back to the country house.

Highlight: Open countryside, pretty villages, the Northumberland Coast and the River Aln Nature Reserve. 


Option 1 - Spy Law, Riverside and Countryside

Distance: 7 miles (11.5km)

Ascent: 560 feet (180m)

In summary: After leaving Alnmouth, meander alongside the River Aln and gently ascend to Spy Law with views on all sides of the countryside. The walk continues moving seawards displaying the Northumberland coast in front of you before returning through colourful cereal fields overlooking the Aln estuary and the once port of Alnmouth towards to sea.

Highlight: A chance to appreciate the variety of scenery that Northumberland has to offer.

Option 2 - To High Buston Hamlet

Distance: 8.5 miles (13.5km)

Ascent: 600 feet (180m)

In summary: Walk around the historic village of Alnmouth and then visit the picturesque village of Lesbury before meandering alongside the River Aln. The walk gives views of countryside and coast, and passes through the Hamlet of High Buston. Learn of the links of the Buston family to King John in 1209 and the traditional “dunking” of the local freemens’ sons. The route returns through undulating countryside culminating in a sight of Alnmouth with colourful houses overlooking the estuary and the sea.

Highlight: An appreciation of how the land and seascape framed local life through the centuries.

Option 3 - Coast, Railway and River

Distance: 10.5 miles (17km)

Ascent: 750 feet (240m)

In summary: This walk gives the visitor a chance to see traditional villages and hamlets of Northumberland and learn about life in this area at various times in the past. The trail passes through green countryside with river, inland and coastal views. The Shilbottle miners’ route to the sea also forms part of this walk. The Hamlet of High Buston is visited along with the villages of Alnmouth, Lesbury and the route passes by the village of Shilbottle with substantial medieval and industrial records.

Highlight: Countryside walking steeped in history with inland and coastal views.


Discover more about Nether Grange and the local area for ideas on how to fill your free day. 


Option 1 - Buston Links and St Oswald's Way

Distance: 7 miles (11km)

Ascent: 420 feet (120m)

In summary: We begin following Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth. We walk through Buston Links. This grassland is carefully managed by the National Trust you will see blooming wild flowers. Beyond the dunes, lies the southern section of Alnmouth Bay and the sound of the waves crashing on the shore accompanies you as you walk along this near deserted section of the Northumberland Coast.

Highlight: The estuary is renowned as a nature reserve and particularly for migrating waders and wildfowl that gather as autumn approaches. 

Option 2 - In the Footsteps of St Oswald, a Northumbrian King

Distance: 9 miles (15km)

Ascent: 500 feet (160m)

In summary: We follow Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth village to the estuary and renowned nature reserve. There are some fantastic views from the higher path down across the Aln Estuary and the colourful houses of Alnmouth as we make our way towards Warkworth. Look out for fossilised tree stumps on the beach after we turn for Alnmouth.

Highlight: Buston Links is a haven for birds and wildflowers, the latter more so in spring and summer, the former can turn up surprises any time of the year.

Option 3 - To Warkworth and Harry Hotspur's Castle

Distance: 11 miles (17km)

Ascent: 600 feet (200m)

In summary: Combining the Northumberland Coast Path, St Oswald's Way and the National Cycleway, our walk heads south to Warkworth Castle. As well as the history, you'll be rewarded with attractive coastal scenery, with plenty of wildlife and wild flowers at different times of the year. The ruined buildings alongside the coast path are the old guano sheds, built well away from the village, presumably due to the smell of this imported fertiliser.  

Highlight: Learn the history of Harry Hotspur, a member of the powerful Percy family who built Warkworth Castle.


Option 1 - The Lesbury Estate

Distance: 8 miles (12.5km)

Ascent: 600 feet (180m)

In summary: The Lesbury Estate, which is part of the Northumberland Estate, stretches from Lesbury to the eastern edge of Alnwick. The route enters the estate at the hamlet of Bilton and we ascend gently to reach the Aln Valley railway route which once connected Alnwick with the London Edinburgh main line railway at Alnmouth. The railway route takes the walkers past the railway depot before returning along River Aln.

Highlight: An appreciation of the Northumberland Estate and the tranquil riverside path.

Option 2 - Exploring the Northumberland Estate

Distance: 10.5 miles (16.5km)

Ascent: 880 feet (280m)

In summary: Hugh Percy the 1st Duke of Northumberland wanted to be able to see all his considerable lands easily so he built two follies to give panoramic views of his estate. This route passes along the north bank of the Aln and then ascends towards the first and less well known of his follies built in the late 17th century. Pastureland walking then leads to the eastern end of the Waterside Estate before returning along the tranquil south bank of the Aln and the hamlet of Bilton.

Highlight: The Ratcheugh Observatory creation of the 1st Duke of Northumberland.

Option 3 - The Waterside Edge

Distance: 11.5 miles (18km)

Ascent: 900 feet (280m)

In summary: Leaving Alnmouth and Lesbury and after walking north of the River Aln the route ascends to Ratcheugh Crag, site of the Ratcheugh Observatory built by the 1st Duke of Northumberland. Walking along a green lane we pass through the hamlet of Denwick and onto Denwick Bridge with views of Alnwick Castle. Entering the Waterside Estate, we walk through pastures before returning along the tranquil south bank of the Aln and the Hamlet of Bilton.

Highlight: An iconic view of Alnwick Castle.


Option 1 - Going around the Foxton Bends

Distance: 6 miles (10km)

Ascent: 450 feet (140m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. The 'Bends' are the meanders in the river Aln to the North of the road bridge into the village. Now managed as a nature reserve, on our walk you can explore the local landscape, discover why the most important harbour north of Newcastle completely vanished, and enjoy a walk along the finest sandy beaches in Northumberland.

Highlight: The nature reserve around the River Aln Estuary is an important place for birds, both resident and migrant throughout the year.

Option 2 - To Boulmer - A Smuggler's Haunt

Distance: 8 miles (13km)

Ascent: 500 feet (140m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. A great storm in 1806 divided Alnmouth cutting off the church and arguably hastening the decline of the busy port. Our walk goes around the estuary to the pretty village of Lesbury, around Foxton Bends, down to the coast and the north to Boulmer. The return journey follows the Coast Path where amongst the dunes overlooking Alnmouth Bay, a Victorian artillery battery established by Algernon Percy, 4th Duke of Northumberland, can be seen. 

Highlight: Now a quiet fishing village, Boulmer had the reputation as a smuggler's haven with tea being the mainstay of the illicit trade in contraband.

Option 3 - Four Northumberland Villages

Distance: 10 miles (16km)

Ascent: 550 feet (180m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. Alnmouth, Hipsburn, Lesbury and Boulmer, four villages with long histories on the Northumberland Coast that we visit on this coastal and countryside walk. There is Alnmouth, once a great port, Hipsburn, inseperable from Alnmouth, Lesbury with its Norman church dating back to 1147CE and the smuggler's haunt of Boulmer. On leaving Boulmer, our route follows the Northumberland Coast Path along Foxton and Alnmouth beaches back to the country house.

Highlight: Open countryside, pretty villages, the Northumberland Coast and the River Aln Nature Reserve. 


Enjoy a leisurely breakfast before making your way home. 


You're welcome to check in from 4pm onwards.


Option 1 - Buston Links and St Oswald's Way

Distance: 7 miles (11km)

Ascent: 420 feet (120m)

In summary: We begin following Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth. We walk through Buston Links. This grassland is carefully managed by the National Trust you will see blooming wild flowers. Beyond the dunes, lies the southern section of Alnmouth Bay and the sound of the waves crashing on the shore accompanies you as you walk along this near deserted section of the Northumberland Coast.

Highlight: The estuary is renowned as a nature reserve and particularly for migrating waders and wildfowl that gather as autumn approaches. 

Option 2 - In the Footsteps of St Oswald, a Northumbrian King

Distance: 9 miles (15km)

Ascent: 500 feet (160m)

In summary: We follow Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth village to the estuary and renowned nature reserve. There are some fantastic views from the higher path down across the Aln Estuary and the colourful houses of Alnmouth as we make our way towards Warkworth. Look out for fossilised tree stumps on the beach after we turn for Alnmouth.

Highlight: Buston Links is a haven for birds and wildflowers, the latter more so in spring and summer, the former can turn up surprises any time of the year.

Option 3 - To Warkworth and Harry Hotspur's Castle

Distance: 11 miles (17km)

Ascent: 600 feet (200m)

In summary: Combining the Northumberland Coast Path, St Oswald's Way and the National Cycleway, our walk heads south to Warkworth Castle. As well as the history, you'll be rewarded with attractive coastal scenery, with plenty of wildlife and wild flowers at different times of the year. The ruined buildings alongside the coast path are the old guano sheds, built well away from the village, presumably due to the smell of this imported fertiliser.  

Highlight: Learn the history of Harry Hotspur, a member of the powerful Percy family who built Warkworth Castle.


Option 1 - The Lesbury Estate

Distance: 8 miles (12.5km)

Ascent: 600 feet (180m)

In summary: The Lesbury Estate, which is part of the Northumberland Estate, stretches from Lesbury to the eastern edge of Alnwick. The route enters the estate at the hamlet of Bilton and we ascend gently to reach the Aln Valley railway route which once connected Alnwick with the London Edinburgh main line railway at Alnmouth. The railway route takes the walkers past the railway depot before returning along River Aln.

Highlight: An appreciation of the Northumberland Estate and the tranquil riverside path.

Option 2 - Exploring the Northumberland Estate

Distance: 10.5 miles (16.5km)

Ascent: 880 feet (280m)

In summary: Hugh Percy the 1st Duke of Northumberland wanted to be able to see all his considerable lands easily so he built two follies to give panoramic views of his estate. This route passes along the north bank of the Aln and then ascends towards the first and less well known of his follies built in the late 17th century. Pastureland walking then leads to the eastern end of the Waterside Estate before returning along the tranquil south bank of the Aln and the hamlet of Bilton.

Highlight: The Ratcheugh Observatory creation of the 1st Duke of Northumberland.

Option 3 - The Waterside Edge

Distance: 11.5 miles (18km)

Ascent: 900 feet (280m)

In summary: Leaving Alnmouth and Lesbury and after walking north of the River Aln the route ascends to Ratcheugh Crag, site of the Ratcheugh Observatory built by the 1st Duke of Northumberland. Walking along a green lane we pass through the hamlet of Denwick and onto Denwick Bridge with views of Alnwick Castle. Entering the Waterside Estate, we walk through pastures before returning along the tranquil south bank of the Aln and the Hamlet of Bilton.

Highlight: An iconic view of Alnwick Castle.


Discover more about Nether Grange and the local area for ideas on how to fill your free day. 


Option 1 - Buston Links and St Oswald's Way

Distance: 7 miles (11km)

Ascent: 420 feet (120m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. We begin following Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth. We walk through Buston Links, this grassland is carefully managed by the National Trust you will see blooming wild flowers. Beyond the dunes, lies the southern section of Alnmouth Bay and the sound of the waves crashing on the shore accompanies you as you walk along this near deserted section of the Northumberland Coast.

Highlight: The estuary is renowned as a nature reserve and particularly for migrating waders and wildfowl that gather as autumn approaches. 

Option 2 - In the Footsteps of St Oswald, a Northumbrian King

Distance: 9 miles (15km)

Ascent: 500 feet (160m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. We follow Lovers Walk out of Alnmouth village to the estuary and renowned nature reserve. There are some fantastic views from the higher path down across the Aln Estuary and the colourful houses of Alnmouth as we make our way towards Warkworth. Look out for fossilised tree stumps on the beach after we turn for Alnmouth.

Highlight: Buston Links is a haven for birds and wildflowers, the latter in Spring and Summer, the former can turn up surprises any time of the year.

Option 3 - To Warkworth and Harry Hotspur's Castle

Distance: 11 miles (17km)

Ascent: 600 feet (200m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. Combining the Northumberland Coast Path, St Oswald's Way and the National Cycleway, our walk heads south to Warkworth Castle. As well as the history, you will be rewarded with attractive coastal scenery, with plenty of wildlife and wild flowers at different times of the year. The ruined buildings alongside the coast path are the old guano sheds, built well away from the village, presumably due to the smell of this imported fertiliser.  

Highlight: Learn the history of Harry Hotspur, a member of the powerful Percy family who built Warkworth Castle.


Option 1 - Spy Law, Riverside and Countryside

Distance: 7 miles (11.5km)

Ascent: 560 feet (180m)

In summary: After leaving Alnmouth, meander alongside the River Aln and gently ascend to Spy Law with views on all sides of the countryside. The walk continues moving seawards displaying the Northumberland coast in front of you before returning through colourful cereal fields overlooking the Aln estuary and the once port of Alnmouth towards to sea.

Highlight: A chance to appreciate the variety of scenery that Northumberland has to offer.

Option 2 - To High Buston Hamlet

Distance: 8.5 miles (13.5km)

Ascent: 600 feet (180m)

In summary: Walk around the historic village of Alnmouth and then visit the picturesque village of Lesbury before meandering alongside the River Aln. The walk gives views of countryside and coast, and passes through the Hamlet of High Buston. Learn of the links of the Buston family to King John in 1209 and the traditional “dunking” of the local freemens’ sons. The route returns through undulating countryside culminating in a sight of Alnmouth with colourful houses overlooking the estuary and the sea.

Highlight: An appreciation of how the land and seascape framed local life through the centuries.

Option 3 - Coast, Railway and River

Distance: 10.5 miles (17km)

Ascent: 750 feet (240m)

In summary: This walk gives the visitor a chance to see traditional villages and hamlets of Northumberland and learn about life in this area at various times in the past. The trail passes through green countryside with river, inland and coastal views. The Shilbottle miners’ route to the sea also forms part of this walk. The Hamlet of High Buston is visited along with the villages of Alnmouth, Lesbury and the route passes by the village of Shilbottle with substantial medieval and industrial records.

Highlight: Countryside walking steeped in history with inland and coastal views.


Option 1 - The Lesbury Estate

Distance: 8 miles (12.5km)

Ascent: 600 feet (180m)

In summary: A repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. The Lesbury Estate, which is part of the Northumberland Estate, stretches from Lesbury to the eastern edge of Alnwick. The route enters the estate at the hamlet of Bilton and we ascend gently to reach the Aln Valley railway route which once connected Alnwick with the London Edinburgh main line railway at Alnmouth. The railway route takes the walkers past the railway depot before returning along River Aln.

Highlight: An appreciation of the Northumberland Estate and the tranquil riverside path.

Option 2 - Exploring the Northumberland Estate

Distance: 10.5 miles (16.5km)

Ascent: 880 feet (280m)

In summary: This walk is a repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. Hugh Percy the 1st Duke of Northumberland wanted to be able to see all his considerable lands easily so he built two follies to give panoramic views of his estate. This route passes along the north bank of the Aln and then ascends towards the first and less well known of his follies built in the late 17th century. Pastureland walking then leads to the eastern end of the Waterside Estate before returning along the tranquil south bank of the Aln and the hamlet of Bilton.

Highlight: The Ratcheugh Observatory creation of the 1st Duke of Northumberland.

Option 3 - The Waterside Edge

Distance: 11.5 miles (18km)

Ascent: 900 feet (280m)

In summary: This walk is a repeat from earlier in the week for 7 night guests. Leaving Alnmouth and Lesbury and after walking north of the River Aln the route ascends to Ratcheugh Crag, site of the Ratcheugh Observatory built by the 1st Duke of Northumberland. Walking along a green lane we pass through the hamlet of Denwick and onto Denwick Bridge with views of Alnwick Castle. Entering the Waterside Estate, we walk through pastures before returning along the tranquil south bank of the Aln and the Hamlet of Bilton.

Highlight: An iconic view of Alnwick Castle.


Enjoy a leisurely breakfast before making your way home. 


You're welcome to check in from 4pm onwards.


Option 1 - Craster to Alnmouth

Distance: 7½ miles (12.5km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m) 

In SummaryWalk south along the coast from the quaint fishing village of Craster to Alnmouth.* Walk on the low cliffs and the beach, with fantastic sea views throughout. 

Highlight: Explore the atmospheric harbour at Craster, and let your nose lead you to famous kipper smokehouse. 

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide

Option 2 - Dunstanburgh Castle

Distance: 10½ miles (17km) 

Ascent: 700 feet (220m) 

In SummaryWalk from Embleton to the iconic ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle, then follow the path all the way back along the beautiful Northumberland Coast to Alnmouth.* 

HighlightDunstanburgh Castle occupies a glorious cliff-top position. Look out for fulmars, razorbills and kittiwakes nesting nearby.

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide

Option 3 - High Newton to Alnmouth

Distance: 12½ miles (20km) 

Ascent: 700 feet (220m) 

In SummaryStarting further north at High Newton this grand coastal walk takes in the sweeping arc of Embleton Bay, Dunstanburgh Castle and Craster, before continuing to Alnmouth.* 

HighlightA glorious opportunity to see the best of the Northumberland Coast. With luck you may see seals, as well as the rich array of birdlife.

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide


Option 1 - St Cuthbert's Way

Distance: 7 miles (11km)

Ascent: 1,050 feet (320m)

In SummaryFollow the St Cuthbert’s Way, onto the northern edge of the Cheviot Hills. Pass Tom Tallon’s Crag, with fine views into Scotland, and then descend to the little market town of Wooler. 

Highlight: An opportunity to get away from it all and appreciate these tranquil landscapes. 

 

Option 2 - Carey Burn

Distance: 9 miles (15km)

Ascent: 1,450 feet (440m)

In SummaryA rambling walk to Wooler through the lower slopes of the Cheviots. Our walk takes in the peaceful valley of Carey Burn and the historic battle site of Humbleton Hill. 

HighlightLook out for the distinctive white-breasted Dippers feeding in the clear waters of Carey Burn. 

 

Option 3 - Yeavering Bell

Distance: 9½ miles (15.5km)

Ascent: 1,750 feet (540m)

In SummaryHead deeper into the Cheviots, including a fairly steep ascent onto Yeavering Bell. Our return route crosses the moor, then descends along the St Cuthbert's Way to Wooler. 

HighlightThe view from the top of Yeavering Bell is one of the finest in the whole of the Cheviots. 

 


View more about Nether Grange and the local area for ideas on how to fill your free day. 


Option 1 - Wether Hill & Brough Law

Distance: 7 miles (11km) 

Ascent: 1,100 feet (330m) 

In SummaryDiscover two of the dominant Iron Age hillforts in the Breamish Valley, Wether Hill and Brough Law. In the Spring, oystercatcher and sandpiper nest on the river gravel and higher up on the hillsides, lapwing and curlew, true moorland birds are a common sight and sound.  Scottish black-faced and the local Cheviot sheep graze the pastures as they have done for centuries.

Highlight: Great vantage points for views of the surrounding area

 

Option 2 - The Breamish Valley

Distance: 8½ miles (13.5km) 

Ascent: 1450 feet (450m) 

In SummaryThe hillsides in the valley were terraced in the Bronze Age and the early occupants who lived here grew crops and raised livestock. Iron Age settlements and their circular hillforts can be found on both sides of the valley, reflecting a long history of occupation in this part of Northumberland.

HighlightDiscovering a prehistoric landscape

 

Option 3 - Hillforts & Droving

Distance: 11 miles (18km) 

Ascent: 1,900 feet (560m) 

In SummaryBrough Law dominates the Breamish Valley, a once mighty Iron Age hillfort, perched high above the river; it’s a must-see site as you explore this ancient landscape. There are great views of the River Breamish, a walk along a section of the Salter’s Road, an ancient drove road with a history going back to the Roman occupation.

Highlight: Walking through an historic landscape

 


Option 1 - Around Rothbury

Distance: 7 miles (11.5km) 

Ascent: 1,100 feet (340m) 

In SummaryA circuit from Rothbury heads onto the hills above the town, following the winding carriage drive, which loops round the forests and moorland of Lord Armstrong’s Cragside Estate. 

Highlight: Look out over the fine rolling countryside of Northumberland with excellent views of the Cheviot and Simonside Hills.

Option 2 - Simonside Hills

Distance: 9 miles (14.5km) 

Ascent: 1,450 feet (440m)

In SummaryWalk from Rothbury through fieldpaths to the village of Thropton, then climb steadily through woodland to the summit of Dove Crag, on the Simonside Hills. We descend back into Rothbury via the Beacon and Garleigh Moor. 

HighlightThe Simonside Hills are a real hidden gem. Look out for the ancient cup-and-ring stones on top of Garleigh Moor. 

 

Option 3 - Along the Simonside Hills

Distance: 10½ miles (17km) 

Ascent: 1,900 feet (580m) 

In SummaryAscend via Garleigh Moor to walk the length of the Simonside Hills. After a steep descent from the summit, we drop down through woodland to Thropton, then climb again to follow part of the carriage-drive back into Rothbury. 

HighlightEnjoy panoramic views up Coquetdale and into the Cheviots from the top of the Simonside Hills.

 

 


Option 1 - Lindisfarne & Bamburgh

Distance: 6 miles (10km)

Ascent: minimal 

In SummaryToday is split into two, the order of which depends on the tides. Discover the Holy Island of Lindisfarne where our walk takes in a romantic castle, medieval priory, rich wildlife and many wonderful views. The other half of the day is spent exploring the wilder side of the Bamburgh Coast. 

Highlight: Crossing the tidal causeway to Lindisfarne to discover this jewel of the Northumberland Coast and its fascinating early Christian history. 

 

Option 2 - Bamburgh coast

Distance: 10 miles (16km) 

Ascent: 400 feet (120m) 

In SummaryFollow the beautiful coast from High Newton along the sands to Beadnell’s old harbour. Pass the busy port of Seahouses, with excellent views of the Farne Islands, before continuing on the beach to Bamburgh. 

HighlightThe final leg along the sands to Bamburgh, with great views of the imposing castle that was once the seat of early Northumbrian Kings.

 

 

Option 3 - Embleton to Bamburgh

Distance: 12 miles (19km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m) 

In SummaryA fantastic longer walk from Embleton to Bamburgh with great views of castles and islands on distant horizons. Wide sandy bays, nature and history combine on this a remarkable walk along the Northumberland Coast. 

HighlightLook out for seabirds and seals, and the rich array of other wildlife that makes its home in this glorious coastal habitat. 

 


Enjoy a leisurely breakfast before making your way home. 


You're welcome to check in from 4pm onwards.


Option 1 - Lindisfarne & Bamburgh

Distance: 6 miles (10km)

Ascent: minimal 

In SummaryToday is split into two, the order of which depends on the tides. Discover the Holy Island of Lindisfarne where our walk takes in a romantic castle, medieval priory, rich wildlife and many wonderful views. The other half of the day is spent exploring the wilder side of the Bamburgh Coast. 

Highlight: Crossing the tidal causeway to Lindisfarne to discover this jewel of the Northumberland Coast and its fascinating early Christian history. 

 

Option 2 - Bamburgh coast

Distance: 10 miles (16km) 

Ascent: 400 feet (120m) 

In SummaryFollow the beautiful coast from High Newton along the sands to Beadnell’s old harbour. Pass the busy port of Seahouses, with excellent views of the Farne Islands, before continuing on the beach to Bamburgh. 

HighlightThe final leg along the sands to Bamburgh, with great views of the imposing castle that was once the seat of early Northumbrian Kings.

 

 

Option 3 - Embleton to Bamburgh

Distance: 12 miles (19km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m) 

In SummaryA fantastic longer walk from Embleton to Bamburgh with great views of castles and islands on distant horizons. Wide sandy bays, nature and history combine on this a remarkable walk along the Northumberland Coast. 

HighlightLook out for seabirds and seals, and the rich array of other wildlife that makes its home in this glorious coastal habitat. 

 


Option 1 - St Cuthbert's Way

Distance: 7 miles (11km)

Ascent: 1,050 feet (320m)

In SummaryFollow the St Cuthbert’s Way, onto the northern edge of the Cheviot Hills. Pass Tom Tallon’s Crag, with fine views into Scotland, and then descend to the little market town of Wooler. 

Highlight: An opportunity to get away from it all and appreciate these tranquil landscapes. 

 

Option 2 - Carey Burn

Distance: 9 miles (15km)

Ascent: 1,450 feet (440m)

In SummaryA rambling walk to Wooler through the lower slopes of the Cheviots. Our walk takes in the peaceful valley of Carey Burn and the historic battle site of Humbleton Hill. 

HighlightLook out for the distinctive white-breasted Dippers feeding in the clear waters of Carey Burn. 

 

Option 3 - Yeavering Bell

Distance: 9½ miles (15.5km)

Ascent: 1,750 feet (540m)

In SummaryHead deeper into the Cheviots, including a fairly steep ascent onto Yeavering Bell. Our return route crosses the moor, then descends along the St Cuthbert's Way to Wooler. 

HighlightThe view from the top of Yeavering Bell is one of the finest in the whole of the Cheviots. 

 


View more about Nether Grange and the local area for ideas on how to fill your free day. 


Option 1 - Wether Hill & Brough Law

Distance: 7 miles (11km) 

Ascent: 1,100 feet (330m) 

In SummaryDiscover two of the dominant Iron Age hillforts in the Breamish Valley, Wether Hill and Brough Law. In the Spring, oystercatcher and sandpiper nest on the river gravel and higher up on the hillsides, lapwing and curlew, true moorland birds are a common sight and sound.  Scottish black-faced and the local Cheviot sheep graze the pastures as they have done for centuries.

Highlight: Great vantage points for views of the surrounding area

 

Option 2 - The Breamish Valley

Distance: 8½ miles (13.5km) 

Ascent: 1450 feet (450m) 

In SummaryThe hillsides in the valley were terraced in the Bronze Age and the early occupants who lived here grew crops and raised livestock. Iron Age settlements and their circular hillforts can be found on both sides of the valley, reflecting a long history of occupation in this part of Northumberland.

HighlightDiscovering a prehistoric landscape

 

Option 3 - Hillforts & Droving

Distance: 11 miles (18km) 

Ascent: 1,900 feet (560m) 

In SummaryBrough Law dominates the Breamish Valley, a once mighty Iron Age hillfort, perched high above the river; it’s a must-see site as you explore this ancient landscape. There are great views of the River Breamish, a walk along a section of the Salter’s Road, an ancient drove road with a history going back to the Roman occupation.

Highlight: Walking through an historic landscape

 


Option 1 - Around Rothbury

Distance: 7 miles (11.5km) 

Ascent: 1,100 feet (340m) 

In SummaryA circuit from Rothbury heads onto the hills above the town, following the winding carriage drive, which loops round the forests and moorland of Lord Armstrong’s Cragside Estate. 

Highlight: Look out over the fine rolling countryside of Northumberland with excellent views of the Cheviot and Simonside Hills.

Option 2 - Simonside Hills

Distance: 9 miles (14.5km) 

Ascent: 1,450 feet (440m)

In SummaryWalk from Rothbury through fieldpaths to the village of Thropton, then climb steadily through woodland to the summit of Dove Crag, on the Simonside Hills. We descend back into Rothbury via the Beacon and Garleigh Moor. 

HighlightThe Simonside Hills are a real hidden gem. Look out for the ancient cup-and-ring stones on top of Garleigh Moor. 

 

Option 3 - Along the Simonside Hills

Distance: 10½ miles (17km) 

Ascent: 1,900 feet (580m) 

In SummaryAscend via Garleigh Moor to walk the length of the Simonside Hills. After a steep descent from the summit, we drop down through woodland to Thropton, then climb again to follow part of the carriage-drive back into Rothbury. 

HighlightEnjoy panoramic views up Coquetdale and into the Cheviots from the top of the Simonside Hills.

 

 


Option 1 - Craster to Alnmouth

Distance: 7½ miles (12.5km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m) 

In SummaryWalk south along the coast from the quaint fishing village of Craster to Alnmouth.* Walk on the low cliffs and the beach, with fantastic sea views throughout. 

Highlight: Explore the atmospheric harbour at Craster, and let your nose lead you to famous kipper smokehouse. 

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide

Option 2 - Dunstanburgh Castle

Distance: 10½ miles (17km) 

Ascent: 700 feet (220m) 

In SummaryWalk from Embleton to the iconic ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle, then follow the path all the way back along the beautiful Northumberland Coast to Alnmouth.* 

HighlightDunstanburgh Castle occupies a glorious cliff-top position. Look out for fulmars, razorbills and kittiwakes nesting nearby.

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide

Option 3 - High Newton to Alnmouth

Distance: 12½ miles (20km) 

Ascent: 700 feet (220m) 

In SummaryStarting further north at High Newton this grand coastal walk takes in the sweeping arc of Embleton Bay, Dunstanburgh Castle and Craster, before continuing to Alnmouth.* 

HighlightA glorious opportunity to see the best of the Northumberland Coast. With luck you may see seals, as well as the rich array of birdlife.

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide


Enjoy a leisurely breakfast before making your way home. 


You're welcome to check in from 4pm onwards.


Option 1 - Craster to Alnmouth

Distance: 7½ miles (12.5km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m) 

In SummaryWalk south along the coast from the quaint fishing village of Craster to Alnmouth.* Walk on the low cliffs and the beach, with fantastic sea views throughout. 

Highlight: Explore the atmospheric harbour at Craster, and let your nose lead you to famous kipper smokehouse. 

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide

Option 2 - Dunstanburgh Castle

Distance: 10½ miles (17km) 

Ascent: 700 feet (220m) 

In SummaryWalk from Embleton to the iconic ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle, then follow the path all the way back along the beautiful Northumberland Coast to Alnmouth.* 

HighlightDunstanburgh Castle occupies a glorious cliff-top position. Look out for fulmars, razorbills and kittiwakes nesting nearby.

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide

Option 3 - High Newton to Alnmouth

Distance: 12½ miles (20km) 

Ascent: 700 feet (220m) 

In SummaryStarting further north at High Newton this grand coastal walk takes in the sweeping arc of Embleton Bay, Dunstanburgh Castle and Craster, before continuing to Alnmouth.* 

HighlightA glorious opportunity to see the best of the Northumberland Coast. With luck you may see seals, as well as the rich array of birdlife.

*due to a stretch of beach walking, this walk may be reversed to avoid doing so at/near high tide


Option 1 - St Cuthbert's Way

Distance: 7 miles (11km)

Ascent: 1,050 feet (320m)

In SummaryFollow the St Cuthbert’s Way, onto the northern edge of the Cheviot Hills. Pass Tom Tallon’s Crag, with fine views into Scotland, and then descend to the little market town of Wooler. 

Highlight: An opportunity to get away from it all and appreciate these tranquil landscapes. 

 

Option 2 - Carey Burn

Distance: 9 miles (15km)

Ascent: 1,450 feet (440m)

In SummaryA rambling walk to Wooler through the lower slopes of the Cheviots. Our walk takes in the peaceful valley of Carey Burn and the historic battle site of Humbleton Hill. 

HighlightLook out for the distinctive white-breasted Dippers feeding in the clear waters of Carey Burn. 

 

Option 3 - Yeavering Bell

Distance: 9½ miles (15.5km)

Ascent: 1,750 feet (540m)

In SummaryHead deeper into the Cheviots, including a fairly steep ascent onto Yeavering Bell. Our return route crosses the moor, then descends along the St Cuthbert's Way to Wooler. 

HighlightThe view from the top of Yeavering Bell is one of the finest in the whole of the Cheviots. 

 


Option 1 - Wether Hill & Brough Law

Distance: 7 miles (11km) 

Ascent: 1,100 feet (330m) 

In SummaryDiscover two of the dominant Iron Age hillforts in the Breamish Valley, Wether Hill and Brough Law. In the Spring, oystercatcher and sandpiper nest on the river gravel and higher up on the hillsides, lapwing and curlew, true moorland birds are a common sight and sound.  Scottish black-faced and the local Cheviot sheep graze the pastures as they have done for centuries.

Highlight: Great vantage points for views of the surrounding area

 

Option 2 - The Breamish Valley

Distance: 8½ miles (13.5km) 

Ascent: 1450 feet (450m) 

In SummaryThe hillsides in the valley were terraced in the Bronze Age and the early occupants who lived here grew crops and raised livestock. Iron Age settlements and their circular hillforts can be found on both sides of the valley, reflecting a long history of occupation in this part of Northumberland.

HighlightDiscovering a prehistoric landscape

 

Option 3 - Hillforts & Droving

Distance: 11 miles (18km) 

Ascent: 1,900 feet (560m) 

In SummaryBrough Law dominates the Breamish Valley, a once mighty Iron Age hillfort, perched high above the river; it’s a must-see site as you explore this ancient landscape. There are great views of the River Breamish, a walk along a section of the Salter’s Road, an ancient drove road with a history going back to the Roman occupation.

Highlight: Walking through an historic landscape

 


View more about Nether Grange and the local area for ideas on how to fill your free day. 


Option 1 - Around Rothbury

Distance: 7 miles (11.5km) 

Ascent: 1,100 feet (340m) 

In SummaryA circuit from Rothbury heads onto the hills above the town, following the winding carriage drive, which loops round the forests and moorland of Lord Armstrong’s Cragside Estate. 

Highlight: Look out over the fine rolling countryside of Northumberland with excellent views of the Cheviot and Simonside Hills.

Option 2 - Simonside Hills

Distance: 9 miles (14.5km) 

Ascent: 1,450 feet (440m)

In SummaryWalk from Rothbury through fieldpaths to the village of Thropton, then climb steadily through woodland to the summit of Dove Crag, on the Simonside Hills. We descend back into Rothbury via the Beacon and Garleigh Moor. 

HighlightThe Simonside Hills are a real hidden gem. Look out for the ancient cup-and-ring stones on top of Garleigh Moor. 

 

Option 3 - Along the Simonside Hills

Distance: 10½ miles (17km) 

Ascent: 1,900 feet (580m) 

In SummaryAscend via Garleigh Moor to walk the length of the Simonside Hills. After a steep descent from the summit, we drop down through woodland to Thropton, then climb again to follow part of the carriage-drive back into Rothbury. 

HighlightEnjoy panoramic views up Coquetdale and into the Cheviots from the top of the Simonside Hills.

 

 


Option 1 - Lindisfarne & Bamburgh

Distance: 6 miles (10km)

Ascent: minimal 

In SummaryToday is split into two, the order of which depends on the tides. Discover the Holy Island of Lindisfarne where our walk takes in a romantic castle, medieval priory, rich wildlife and many wonderful views. The other half of the day is spent exploring the wilder side of the Bamburgh Coast. 

Highlight: Crossing the tidal causeway to Lindisfarne to discover this jewel of the Northumberland Coast and its fascinating early Christian history. 

 

Option 2 - Bamburgh coast

Distance: 10 miles (16km) 

Ascent: 400 feet (120m) 

In SummaryFollow the beautiful coast from High Newton along the sands to Beadnell’s old harbour. Pass the busy port of Seahouses, with excellent views of the Farne Islands, before continuing on the beach to Bamburgh. 

HighlightThe final leg along the sands to Bamburgh, with great views of the imposing castle that was once the seat of early Northumbrian Kings.

 

 

Option 3 - Embleton to Bamburgh

Distance: 12 miles (19km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m) 

In SummaryA fantastic longer walk from Embleton to Bamburgh with great views of castles and islands on distant horizons. Wide sandy bays, nature and history combine on this a remarkable walk along the Northumberland Coast. 

HighlightLook out for seabirds and seals, and the rich array of other wildlife that makes its home in this glorious coastal habitat. 

 


Enjoy a leisurely breakfast before making your way home. 


You're welcome to check in from 4pm onwards.


Option 1 - Along the coast from Boulmer to Craster

Distance: 7 miles (11km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m)

In Summary: Starting at Boulmer we walk north along the Northumberland Coast Path, to the village of Craster. We'll finish the day here, after a loop north of the village with views towards the impressive headland ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle.

Highlight: The imposing ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle visible from the high ground north of Craster.

 

Option 2 - Along the coast from Seaton House to Craster

Distance: 8 miles (13km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m)

In Summary: Starting at Seaton House, we walk north along the Northumberland Coast Path, to the village of Craster. We'll finish the day here, after a loop north of the village with views towards the impressive headland ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle.

Highlight: The imposing ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle visible from the high ground north of Craster.

Option 3 - Alnmouth to Craster

Distance: 11 miles (17½km) 

Ascent: 450 feet (140m)

In Summary: From the house we head north on today's walk across the beach to Boulmer. We continue on to Craster to join the other two groups for a well earned pint!

Highlight: An opportunity to see some of the best of the Northumberland Coast's fauna. With luck you may see grey seals, gannets, and possibly even fulmar and kittiwakes gliding across the top of the surf.


Option 1 - Warkwarth to Alnmouth

Distance: 6 miles (9.5km) 

Ascent: 380 feet (120m)

In Summary: Starting in historic Warkworth, follow in the footsteps of St Oswald along the coast to Alnmouth.

Highlight: Warkworth's medieval castle and the expansive views out to sea.

 

Option 2 - Amble to Alnmouth

Distance: 8½ miles (14km)

Ascent: 500 feet (150m)

In Summary: Starting from the harbour village of Amble we follow the River Coquet to historic Warkwarth before continuing along the coast to Alnmouth.

Highlight: The Amble harbour boardwalk gives spectacular views of Coquet Island wildlife sanctuary

 

Option 3 - Hauxley Nature Reserve to Alnmouth

Distance: 11 miles (17.5km)

Total ascent: 560 feet (170m)

In Summary: From Northumberland Wildlife Trust's nature reserve at Hauxley, a varied walk all the way back to Alnmouth via the harbour at Amble and historic Warkwarth.

Highlight: Wildlife spotting at the nature reserve


Discover more about Nether Grange and the local area for ideas on how to fill your free day. 


Option 1 - Craster to Embleton

Distance: 5 miles (7½km)

Ascent: 300 feet (80m)

In Summary: We head north today from Craster walking along coastal paths and finishing in Embleton.

Highlight: On today's walk we will pass Dunstanburgh Castle, a prominent feature perched on the headland, aptly named Castle Point.

 

Option 2 - Craster, Low Newton and Embleton

Distance: 6 miles (9½km) 

Ascent: 350 feet (100m)

In Summary: As the other walks in today's schedule, we first pass Dunstanburgh Castle and head for Embleton via the coastal village of Low Newton.

Highlight: The freshwater pools at Newton Pool Nature Reserve serve as a great pit-stop for migrating birds. Keep your eyes peeled for rare birds dropping in on the breeze.

Option 3 - Craster, Newton Point and Embleton

Distance: 8 miles (13km) 

Ascent: 520 feet (160m)

In Summary: Starting at Craster, this fine coastal walk arcs around the beautiful Embleton Bay. We then make a loop around High Newton before returning to Embleton.

Highlight: The expansive skies and sandscapes of Embleton Bay. The views on this stretch of coastline are huge!


Option 1 - Rothbury, Dove Crag & the River Coquet

Distance: 7 miles (11km) 

Ascent: 1,160 feet (350m)

In Summary: Starting from Rothbury we follow St Oswalds Way onto the lower slopes of the Simonside Ridge. Moorland, forest and field paths with a sprinkling of pre-history on the way, take us to Thropton where we may meet up with the other groups for a drink before heading back to Nether Grange.

Highlight: Excellent views over the fine rolling countryside of Northumberland. Look out for the ancient cup-and-ring stones on Garleigh Moor. 

Option 2 - Dove Crag & Rothbury

Distance: 9 miles (14½km) 

Ascent: 1,450 feet (440m)

In Summary: Starting in the village of Thropton we climb steadily through woodland to the summit of Dove Crag, on the Simonside Hills. From there we descend into Rothbury via the Beacon and Garleigh Moor then follow fieldpaths back to Thropton. 

Highlight: The Simonside Hills are a real hidden gem. Look out for the ancient cup-and-ring stones on top of Garleigh Moor. 

Option 3 - Simonside Ridge

Distance: 10½ miles (17km) 

Ascent: 1,900 feet (580m)

In Summary: The walk will follow part of St Oswald's Way from Rothbury onto Simonside for an 'al fresco' lunch either on or below the Simonside Ridge. We will then descend to Thropton for a pint and a warm through with the other groups in the local pub.

Highlight: Standing on the exposed sandstone formations that define the Simonside Ridge it's easy to see why the bronze age people revered them as spiritually significant features, the view up there really is vast.


Option 1 - Seahouses, Budle Bay and Bamburgh

Distance: 4½ miles (7km) 

Ascent: 180 feet (60m)

In Summary: We stride out from Seahouses to Bamburgh and then extend our loop around the corner of Budle Bay.

Highlight: Wonderful walking along impressive dunescapes.

Option 2 - High Newton to Bamburgh

Distance: 10 miles (16km)

Ascent: 400 feet (120m)

In Summary: Taking in Beadnell Bay, Seahouses and Bamburgh, this walk covers a stunning section of the Northumbrian Coast.

Highlight: The final few miles of walking along vast sandy beaches towards the impressive ramparts of Bamburgh Castle.

Option 3 - Low Newton to Bamburgh

Distance: 11½ miles (18½km)

Ascent: 400 feet (120m)

In Summary: Starting out with a loop of Low Newton, we get views south to Embleton Bay, as well as Beadnell Bay, Seahouses and the stunning fortifications of Bamburgh Castle.

Highlight: The castle at Bamburgh is still inhabited, and is perfectly placed on the headland on the edge of the village.


Enjoy a leisurely breakfast before making your way home. 


Nether Grange

Sitting pretty in the centre of the quiet harbour village of Alnmouth, Nether Grange stands in an area rich in natural beauty and historic gravitas. There are moving views of the dramatic North Sea coastline from the house too. This one-time 18th century granary was first converted into a large family home for the High Sheriff of Northumberland in the 19th century and then reimagined as a characterful hikers’ hotel. Many of the 36 bedrooms look out across the sea, while a large lounge, conservatory and adjoining bar are there to entertain you. Easily accessible from the house are the coast path while inland lies the Northumberland National Park. North are the Farne Islands and their spectacular seabird colonies and close by is Lindisfarne and its romantic castle accessible at low-tide via an ancient pilgrim’s path. Nearby too is the medieval market town of Alnwick and its eponymous castle, as well as the atmospheric ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle, perched on a grassy peninsula to the south of Embbelton Bay. Best of all though is Bamburgh Castle, built to resemble a magnificent medieval fortress but actually an impressive Victorian folly.

 

Need to know

Important Covid-19 steps we have taken for guest safety: Please Read

As we slowly reopen in the wake of the Coronavirus lockdown, our country house stays are set to be organised a little differently; extra steps have been taken to keep our guests, house teams and leaders safe while we return to action. We ask all our guests to respect the measures put in place.

Initially the overall capacity of the houses has been reduced. Guests must wear face coverings in public spaces. To adhere to social distancing guidelines, we have taken the necessary steps to space out furniture and seating in public areas. In addition, a one-way system will be in place around the house. Adequate signage will be displayed to support the direction of travel to be followed by guests and house teams.

As a temporary measure, we will not be servicing rooms during a stay. Extra tea, coffee, milk, and toiletries will be made available on request for all guests. It is recommended that guests bring their own toiletries for the duration of their stay. We have removed all non-essential and reusable items from our rooms for the meantime including cushions, hairdryers, bathrobes, bed throws, and printed materials to reduce the number of items that need to be disinfected. Hairdryers will be available on request. Clean towels will be available on request. We will though be increasing the frequency of cleaning in our public areas providing particular attention to frequently touched items including door handles and handrails.

For now, there is no cream tea on arrival day. We have also adapted our food offering to remove all buffets and open food items. Different sittings may be required for breakfast and dinner due to the occupancy and size of the house. Picnic lunches will now be pre-ordered the night before from an order form in the room. The bar in each country house will be open, and we will be offering a table service for drinks. At this time there is no, or only a very limited, evening social programme available. Outdoor swimming pools at those houses that have them will re-open throughout August, except at Freshwater Bay House, where the pool will remain closed for 2020. Indoor swimming pools will remain closed.

For more information and to see all the steps taken, visit our page on how house stays will be adapted.

Rooms

Tea & coffee-making facilities, TV, Hairdryer, Toiletries, Wi-Fi

Stay in one of the house’s smartly presented rooms up an impressive sweeping staircase. Full of warm tones or coastal colours and comfy touches they’re a great base for exploring the area. With 36 bedrooms, Nether Grange has plenty of space and there’s a range of Good and Better Rooms to choose from.

All ‘Good’ rooms are ensuite and furnished to a high standard. There are also several ‘Better’ Rooms that are either larger or have a desirable view, a more luxurious mattress and larger television – upgrade your stay for just an extra £15-25 per person per night. You can choose a specific room for an extra £30 per room, subject to availability. Upgrade supplements still apply.

Facilities

Free Wi-Fi, boot room and drying room, extensive garden, multi-purpose activity room, lounges, library and board games to borrow

After a day walking on the coast, come back to the house and its specially tailored walkers’ facilities. Relax by sitting in the elevated terrace gardens with a cooling drink and a cracking sea view or challenge a fellow guest to a game of croquet or giant chess, backed by views of the beach and sea beyond. The spick and span sky-blue painted bar with its mismatched blue and stripy seats boasts all the requisite cosiness and British bonhomie, plus a selection of local beers and your favourite tipple. Settle in.

Food & Drink

As at all our country houses, holidays are full board, from afternoon tea served as a welcome treat through that evening’s meal to a hearty breakfast on the day of departure. Lunch is a chance to stock up on our famous picnic snacks. Food at Nether Grange is hearty and has a strong emphasis on ingredients from the area and seasonal produce. Once a week the light-filled dining room hosts a Local Food Night, when, over a sociable evening, you might try a five-course feast of local flavours.

Accessibility

For accessibility and assistance information, please contact our expert team on 020 3974 8865

10673_0024 - Nether Grange - Chess

Getting to Nether Grange

Find out more about this location including travel details and room types.

More Information

What to Bring

“There’s no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong type of clothing!” goes the adage. Come prepared for all eventualities and you’ll walk in comfort as well as safety. Britain’s famous for its changeable weather, so here’s our advice on what to wear and bring.

Essentials

  • Waterproof walking boots providing ankle support and good grip.
  • A waterproof jacket and over-trousers
  • Gloves and a warm hat (it can be chilly at any time of the year)
  • Rucksack
  • Water bottle (at least 1 litre capacity)
  • A small torch (everywhere in winter, year round in mountains)
  • Sun hat and sunscreen
    Denim jeans and waterproof capes are not suitable on any walks.

Recommended

  • Several layers of clothing, which can be added or removed
  • Specialist walking socks to avoid blisters.
  • A first aid kit inc plasters– your leader’s first aid kit doesn’t contain any medication
  • Sit mat (insulated pad to sit on when you stop for a break)

You might also want

  • Walking poles, particularly useful for descents.
  • Insect repellent
  • Flask for hot drinks
  • Rigid lunch box
  • Gaiters
  • Blister kit (eg Compeed) just in case
  • Waterproof rucksack liner

Guest Reviews

All holidays are subject to availability. Prices are subject to change.
Prices based on two people sharing. Supplements may apply.
Non-member fee: £20 per person.

Holiday Prices

Date (Start - End) Nights Itinerary Price Status Trip Notes Book
2020
25 Sep - 02 Oct
7 2020 Guided Walking 1 £845 Unavailable to Book Unavailable Trip Notes
16 Oct - 23 Oct
7 2020 Guided Walking 1 £845 Unavailable to Book Unavailable Trip Notes
23 Oct - 30 Oct
7 2020 Guided Walking 3 £845 Available Trip Notes Book Now
30 Oct - 06 Nov
7 2020 Guided Walking 2 £745 Available Trip Notes Book Now
06 Nov - 13 Nov
7 2020 Guided Walking 1 £745 Available Trip Notes Book Now
2021
05 Mar - 12 Mar
7 Version 5 £775 £675 Save £100 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
12 Mar - 19 Mar
7 Version 5 £775 £675 Save £100 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
26 Mar - 02 Apr
7 Version 1 £865 £765 Save £100 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
02 Apr - 09 Apr
7 Version 1 £865 £765 Save £100 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
07 May - 14 May
7 Version 1 £949 £919 Save £30 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
14 May - 21 May
7 Version 1 £949 £919 Unavailable to Book Unavailable Trip Notes
21 May - 28 May
7 Version 1 £949 £909 Save £40 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
28 May - 04 Jun
7 Version 1 £949 £889 Save £60 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
04 Jun - 11 Jun
7 Version 1 £949 £919 Save £30 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
11 Jun - 18 Jun
7 Version 1 £949 £929 Save £20 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
18 Jun - 25 Jun
7 Version 1 £949 £919 Save £30 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
25 Jun - 02 Jul
7 Version 1 £949 £919 Save £30 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
02 Jul - 09 Jul
7 Version 1 £949 £899 Save £50 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
09 Jul - 16 Jul
7 Version 1 £949 £899 Unavailable to Book Unavailable Trip Notes
23 Jul - 30 Jul
7 Version 1 £949 Available Trip Notes Book Now
13 Aug - 20 Aug
7 Version 1 £949 £879 Save £70 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
20 Aug - 27 Aug
7 Version 1 £949 £899 Save £50 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
27 Aug - 03 Sep
7 Version 1 £949 £879 Save £70 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
03 Sep - 10 Sep
7 Version 1 £949 £899 Save £50 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
24 Sep - 01 Oct
7 Version 1 £865 Available Trip Notes Book Now
01 Oct - 08 Oct
7 Version 1 £865 Available Trip Notes Book Now
15 Oct - 22 Oct
7 Version 1 £865 £795 Unavailable to Book Unavailable Trip Notes
29 Oct - 05 Nov
7 Version 5 £775 £675 Save £100 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
05 Nov - 12 Nov
7 Version 5 £775 £675 Save £100 Per Person Trip Notes Book Now
Duration:
7 nights
Type:
Guided Walking
Walking Grade:
1 & 2

7 nights from £775pp £675pp

Save up to £100 per person

...or call 020 3974 8865

For group bookings of 10+ people click here

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